Characters Everyone Loves to Hate

You know the ones: characters who so get under your skin that you can’t stop watching week after week, characters who get talked about at the office the next day, characters so brazenly themselves that you can’t believe they just did that? But they did. How about a few examples to paint the picture?

Severus Snape from the Harry Potter series Jack Donaghy from 30 Rock Jenny Schecter on The L Word Simon Cowell as himself on American Idol

What makes these characters so compelling …

Special Guest: Jim Cirile on Your Agent Relationship

Our friend Jim Cirile over at Coverage Ink: The Screenwriter’s Advantage and Writers on the Storm posts a chock-full-o’-goodies newsletter to his subscribers-only list. But lucky you! We’re reposting an excerpt here for you.

Jim’s February, 2009 installment included this useful reminder: “The 5 Best Ways to *Lose* an Agent.” Witty, insightful, and oh so true, here is Jim’s article, posted with permission, for THE STORY SPOT readers to enjoy.

“Got agent? Good. Now can you hold onto them? …

Collaboration: Five Ways to Make It Work

Many of you loyal Story Spot readers find yourselves working collaboratively as a matter of course. Whether with other writers or with directors, producers, or even literary agents, working together to create one story can be strange, wonderful, maddening, and challenging. One thing is for certain, when you’re writing collaboratively, there is rarely a dull moment.

What can we do to make it the best possible experience AND ensure that the …

Cory Doctorow’s Tips for Finishing Your Writing Projects

Take it from a guy who oughta know: sitting your squirrely butt at that keyboard or notebook for 20 minutes every day (yes, weekends too) is one true tip for finishing your writing projects. Cory Doctorow, Canadian writer extraordinaire lays it out in his feature for LOCUS Magazine for you who are convinced that there just isn’t enough time in a day to complete that insurmountable project (yes, he’s talking to me too, at times.) And you know what? …

Drama! Dramatize. Dramatic.

Drama, as you know from high school, can be defined as an exciting series of events. Writers know that definition to be woefully inadequate. Stringing together a series of events, no matter how scintillating, death-defying, or fantastic, can amount to a big ol’ bag o’ dull unless those events are dramatizing meaningful story points.

Writers also know the pain of rewriting to someone else’s notes when those notes are event-based …